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Grating the Nutmeg

The podcast of Connecticut history. A joint production of the State Historian and Connecticut Explored.
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Now displaying: October, 2017

A Joint Venture of the State Historian and Connecticut Explored - with support from the Sue B. Hart Foundation.

Oct 26, 2017

      In this special 3 Part series on Witch-Hunting in Connecticut, we investigate the surprising story of witchcraft in colonial Connecticut. Why did Connecticut execute New England's 1st witch? Why was it early New England's fiercest prosecutor of witches (Who knew?) And how did European witch-hunting affect the same practice in New England? We cover all this and more in an exciting three-cast. 

    Episode one talks about the European witchcraft tradition from witch Connecticut's witch hunts were derived. 

Oct 26, 2017

 

 

           In part two of our Special Series Witch-Hunting in Connecticut, you'll hear the sobering tale of Connecticut's rifle in New England witch-hunting, from executing the first witch, to the Hartford Witch hunts of the 1660s, to the trial of Katherine Harrison, arguably the most important witchcraft trial to take place before Salem. 

Oct 26, 2017

   In part 3 of our Special Witch-Hunting in Connecticut series, Brenda Miller, Executive Director of the Hartford History Center and I interview historian Richard Ross about his new book, Before Salem: Witch- the Connecticut River Valley 1647-1663. Ross's historical spadework provides many new insights into one of Connecticut's most important, and least well known, events.

 Before Salem

Oct 4, 2017

Are you a member of the 9/11 generation? Do you wonder how 9/11 and its aftermath affected kids who witnessed the terrorist attack on the U.S. 16 years ago? In this episode CCSU history professor Matt Warshauer explores the 9/11 generation and wonders about the next generation who will have no emotional connection to it—right now half of high school students were born after 9/11. As Warshauer notes, this is history still in the making.

We thank Matt Warshauer, Diane Smith, Bilal Sekou, Avery Eddy, Patrick O’Sullivan, Avon Public Library, and The Old State house with audio courtesy of CT-N, the Connecticut Network.

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