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Grating the Nutmeg

The podcast of Connecticut history. A joint production of the State Historian and Connecticut Explored.
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Grating the Nutmeg
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A Joint Venture of the State Historian and Connecticut Explored - with support from the Sue B. Hart Foundation.

Aug 23, 2016
13. DISCOVERY! CONNECTICUT'S MOST IMPORTANT DIG EVER!

     Take an earwitness journey to the 1659 John Hollister homesite on the Connecticut River in ancient Wethersfield, and join the archaeologists, graduate students, and volunteers from many walks of life as they uncover one of the richest early colonial sites ever found in Connecticut. 

      State historian Walter Woodward brings you with him on the last day of the dig as for a first hand account of what they're finding at this amazing site, and what it means for understanding our early history. Hear from State archeologist Brian Jones, Lori Kissel, Scot Brady, Glenda Rose, Dick Hughes, Fiona Jones, Mandy Ranslow (president of FOSA - Friends of the Office of State Archaeology)  and others about their epic archeological adventure. 

       You'll also find companion photographs of the site at the Connecticut State Historian's Facebook page (please like) and the Connecticut Explored website ctexplored.org (please subscribe to the magazine)

 

Aug 2, 2016
12. GREAT FINDS! – INSIDE AND OUT

The Great Find!

A pair of 18th century portraits comes up for auction. Should the Connecticut Historical Society make a bid? This is a behind-the-scenes story in more ways than one! Host: Elizabeth Normen, CT Explored. Featuring Ilene Frank, Connecticut Historical Society

Pleasant Valley Drive-In 

Did you go to the drive-in movies when you were a kid? You still can! Join Jennifer LaRue for another segment inspired by the "Small Towns, BIG Stories" theme of the Summer 2016 issue of Connecticut Explored. 

Growing Up in Connecticut

Are you a millennial, Gen Xer, Baby Boomer, or member of the Silent Generation? Relive your childhood with the Connecticut Historical Society's special exhibition "Growing Up in Connecticut." (picture, left) Host: Elizabeth Normen, CT Explored. Featuring Ben Gammell, Connecticut Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul 13, 2016
11. Wallace Nutting and the Webb Deane Stevens Museum

Most people know the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum as the place where George Washington and French comte de Rochambeau planned the campaign that won the American victory in the Revolutionary War. This year, a new  museum exhibit  commemorates another important event, one that happened there 100 years ago in 1916. That's when the minister, photographer, antiques expert, and marketing entrepreneur Wallace Nutting made Webb-Deane-Stevens one of the very first historic house museums in America. Museum Executive Director Charles Lyle tells us the amazing story about an amazing man who was the Martha Stewart of his generation and more, in episode 11 of Grating the Nutmeg. 

Jun 27, 2016
10. POETRY AND PATRIOTS IN STONINGTON & SHACK ATTACK!

More stories from "Small Towns, Big Stories," the summer 2016 issue of Connecticut Explored .

Poetry and Patriots in Stonington

A visit to an unexpected listing on the National Register of Historic Places: poet James Merrill's fourth-floor walk-up pied-a-terre in Stonington. Special guest poet-in-residence Noah Warren reads from Merrill's work and reveals how this place inspired both his and Merrill's poetry. And Beth Moore of the Stonington Historical Society gives us a highlights tour of historic sites in Stonington.

Shack Attack: Summer Eats in Connecticut

Find out where to get great clams, hot dogs, and ice cream at Connecticut's most iconic roadside food shacks.

Jun 7, 2016
9. LYMAN ORCHARDS TURNS 275 AND WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT–SUMMER EDITION

This year, Lyman Orchards in Middlefield celebrates its 275th anniversary. State historian Walt Woodward sat down with John Lyman III to talk about the history of the 12th oldest family business in America, which also happens to be one of New England's most popular agri-tourism destinations.

Then, listen to What's It All About – Summer Edition, a lively discussion with Bill Hosley and Betsy Fox about their favorite small towns with BIG stories from the summer issue of Connecticut Explored.

May 22, 2016
8. A SERVANT SHOWS US THE TWAIN HOME  & 10/40  AT FLORENCE GRISWOLD MUSEUM

What if you could tour writer Mark Twain's house with the maid, getting the juicy inside story? Join Connecticut Explored editor Jennifer LaRue as she tags along on one of the Mark Twain House's new living history tours. Plus learn about the living history tour offered at the Windsor Historical Society. Then publisher Elizabeth Normen smells the lilacs in the Florence Griswold Museum's gardens and takes you through their current exhibition celebrating executive director Jeffrey Anderson's 40th anniversary. 

Apr 19, 2016
7. A COMMUNIST'S ARREST IN 1950'S NEW HAVEN

In 1954, 32-year-old Al Marder was arrested in New Haven along with several others under the Smith Act for allegedly working to overthrow the US government. After a lengthy trial, during which he was defended by the celebrated civil rights lawyer Catherine Roraback, he was acquitted. Hear Al tell in his own words what he was fighting for and what it feels like when the full power of the state, federal, and local government is aimed at you. Recorded at New Haven Museum April 14, 2016

Apr 19, 2016

In 1954, 32-year-old Al MArder was arrested in New Haven along with several others under the Smith Act for allegedly working to overthrow the US government. After a lengthy trial, during which he was defended by the celebrated civil rights lawyer Catherine Roraback, he was acquitted. Hear Al tell in his own words what he was fighting for and what it feels like when the full power of the state, federal, and local government is aimed at you. This is the full length interview, recorded at the New Haven Museum on April 14, 2016. 

Mar 13, 2016
6. IRISH EYES, AND VOTING AND PROTESTING

        Just in time for St. Paddy's Day, Jamie Eves of the Windham Textile and History Museum in Willimantic talks to State Historian Walt Woodward about their new exhibit "Irish Eyes: The Irish Experience in a Connecticut Mill Town.

        Then, in "What's It All About?", the Connecticut Explored editorial team discusses the articles in the Spring 2016 issue focused on civic engagement including Mary Donohue on religious equality for Jews and Dave Corrigan on the income tax protest of 1991. And publisher Elizabeth Normen interviews Melanie Anderson Bourbeau, curator of Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, about the suffrage journey of Hill-Stead's architect and last resident Theodate Pope Riddle. 

        It's history worth listening to, and talking about – on Episode 6 of Grating the Nutmeg. 

 

Mar 3, 2016
5. WHAT MAKES CONNECTICUT CONNECTICUT

     This podcast was inspired by Connecticut Captured: A 21st Century Look at an American Classic, on view at the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford through March 12. This exhibit, by acclaimed visual documentarian Carol M. Highsmith, is an effort to capture in images the character of Connecticut in the 21st century.

      State Historian Walter Woodward worked with Carol Highsmith on this project, and when the exhibit opened, he and his musical group The Band of Steady Habits gave a musical lecturetitled "What Makes Connecticut Conecticut" Someone recorded the talk, and though the sound isn't perfect, we thought you might find this account of Connecticut's character worth a listen.

 

Feb 10, 2016
4: CONNECTICUT CLOCKS AND AMERICAN WORDS

     In our first segment, Jennifer LaRue takes you to the American Clock and Watch Museum in Bristol, where Executive Director Patti Philippon tells us about the Mickey Mouse watch that saved the Timex Company during the Great Depression, and so much more. The sound of the many different clocks ticking, ringing, and counting the time make this episode a feast for the ears.

      In segment two, Sarajane Cedrone finds out why Noah Webster's dictionary was so revolutionary when she visits Jennifer DiCola Matos, Executive Director of the Noah Webster House Museum in West Hartford. 

Jan 14, 2016
3: SPEED DATE A HISTORY CONFERENCE / MUSICAL CLUB OF HARTFORD

In Grating the Nutmeg Episode 3, State Historian Walt Woodward takes you on a whirlwind tour of the Fall 2015 Association for the Study of Connecticut History conference, whose focus was "Connecticut in World War I". In part one of a two-part program Woodward condenses talks on weapons and whaling, the wartime transformation of Bridgeport, and Connecticut's women physicians in the war doown to their essence. There's also a lunch time conversation with CCSU professor Matt Warshauer on a new experimental course he has developed on and for the post 911 generation. Sections are interspersedw ith World War I song as performed by historian musician Rick Spencer in one of highlight conference presentations.

In segment three Connecticut Explored Editor Jennifer LaRue reprises her Fall 2015 article on The Musical Club of Hartford, interviewing three club members on their experiences as Club members. 

 

Dec 16, 2015
2:  ICONIC BRANDS / AUDOBON BIRD CALL / TOASTER?

Listen in as the editorial team of Connecticut Explored discusses highlights of the Winter 2015-2016 issue - on Connecticut's iconic brands. Then go on a field trip with historian Rich Malley to hear Roger Eddy's Audubon bird call in action and visit the New Britain Industrial Museum to find out about hardware and appliances from long ago. 

Nov 22, 2015
 1: WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT / LEBANON'S AMAZING BENEFACTOR

     In this first podcast, publisher Elizabeth Normen, Editor Jennifer LaRue, and State Historian Walt Woodward explain what Grating the Nutmeg is About; how it got its spicy name; and what their vision for its development is.

    Then, inspired by the Fall 2015 Connecticut Explored issue on the history of Connecticut philanthropy, Walt Woodward visits Lebanon's historic green to learn from Ed Tollman about that town's amazing life-long benefactor, Hugh Trumbull Adams.

     Grating the Nutmeg is a co-production of the State Historian and Connecticut Explored, with support from the Sue B. Hart Foundation.

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